Ghost Gear | WWF
WWF
© WWF

© Brian J Skerry / WWF

There is a silent predator in our oceans: abandoned, lost or discarded fishing gear, known as ghost gear. This type of waste can scour the ocean bottom, trap and drown marine wildlife and endanger navigation and fisher economies.

Globally, 66 per cent of marine mammals, 50 per cent of seabirds and all sea turtles species have been impacted by marine debris, including ghost gear.

© Jurgen Freund / WWF

How do we solve the ghost gear problem?

WWF is calling on governments, fishing gear designers and producers, fishers, and the public to tackle the problem of ghost gear and stop our ocean’s drowning in plastic. As this is a global problem, we have to take action together, by supporting a new Global Plastics Treaty.

Ghost gear is the most deadly form of marine plastic debris in our ocean. Take action now by signing the petition.

© Brian J Skerry / WWF

A danger for all species

Globally, 66 per cent of marine mammal species, half of all seabird species and all sea turtles species have been impacted by marine debris, including ghost gear.
 

A GROWING PROBLEM

Ghost Gear
© Rich Carey / WWF

At least 10 per cent of marine litter is estimated to be made up of fishing waste, which means that between 500,000 and 1 million tonnes of fishing gear is likely entering the ocean every year.

WHAT WE DON'T SEE

Lost fishing gear breaks corals, scours bottom habitat of sessile animals, damages vegetation, builds up sediment, and smothers and impedes access to key environments.